Neuroscience/Psychosocial Safety: Minimising the inherent psychological risk of physical illness and injury

24 Jun 2020
12:20

Neuroscience/Psychosocial Safety: Minimising the inherent psychological risk of physical illness and injury

This presentation describes some of the research that outlines the risk associated with individuals who have a physical illness or injury, going on to develop psychological secondary injury or ill-health. The research suggests that in Australia, 10-20% of people requiring hosptilation for a traumatic injury will go on to develop psychological conditions such as PTSD and/or depression and that with regards to illness, those who have survived diseases such as cancer, may be up to 6 times more likely to develop a co-morbid psychological condition.

The presentation goes on to look at some of the research around factors or interventions that might “innoculate’ an individual from developing these psychological secondary concerns. It summarises these interventions in a practical way and then links the interventions to a successful case study, where a seriously injured individual was able to recover from a significant, traumatic event but yet did not go on to develop any psychopathology and what strategies and tools were employed in order to assist the individual to recover successfully.

The presentation concludes with reference to the National Return to Work Strategy 2020-2030 and its key findings that can be applied across Australian workplaces to facilitate successful return to work.